The following material is very useful for Greek language teachers as well as for those who are learning Greek and looking for a more motivative teaching methodology.

Making an effective lesson plan takes time, diligence, and an understanding of your students’ goals and abilities. The goal, as with all teaching, is to motivate the students to take in what you are teaching and to retain as much as possible.

1.Learning objective: At the beginning of every lesson, write your lesson plan goal at the top. It should be incredibly simple. Something like, ”Students will be able to describe their best friend”.If you want to do a bit extra, add how they might do this (through video, games, flashcards, etc.).

2. Overview: Use broad strokes to outline the big ideas for the class.This depends on the length of your class.

3.Plan your timeline. If there’s a lot to cover in a fixed amount of time, break your plan into sections that you can speed up or slow down to accommodate changes as they happen. We’ll use a 1-hour class as an example. (warm-up,present information,guided practice, free practice, conclusion).

4.Get to know your students. Identify clearly who you are going to educate. What is their learning style (visual, auditory, tactile or a combination)? What might they already know, and where might they be deficient? Focus your plan to fit the overall group of students you have in class, and then make modifications as necessary to account for students with disabilities, those who are struggling or unmotivated, and those who are gifted.

5.Use multiple student interaction patterns.Some students do well on their own, others in pairs, and yet others in big groups. So long as you’re letting them interact and build off each other, you’re doing your job. But since each student is different, try to allow opportunities for all types of interactions. Your students (and the cohesion of the class) will be better for it!

6.Address a variety of learning styles. You’re bound to have some students that can’t sit through a 25-minute video and others who can’t be bothered to read a two-page excerpt from a book. Neither is dumber than the other, so do them a service by switching up your activities to utilize every student’s abilities.

you can also read:Tips for online tutors

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